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Agricultural well installed at City Farm

July 16th, 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Jenna Smith
Central Coast Grown
San Luis Obispo, CA 93403
805.769.8344;
news@centralcoastgrown.org

well

Drilling the well

Agricultural well installed at City Farm, San Luis Obispo

The dream of an agricultural site devoted to the education and creation of a locally driven food system is starting to take shape through the motivation and dedication of the team at Central Coast Grown (CCG). This last week marks the true beginning of development on the City Farm, San Luis Obispo as an agricultural well has been drilled. The well allows for irrigation, one of the most critical resources for any farming operation. The ability to bring water on site at the City Farm, San Luis Obispo will foster the growth of future crops and further the progress of instilling local foods into the landscape of the San Luis Obispo community.

With the hope of farming at the City Farm beginning in the fall of this year, the well marks a true turning point at CCG. The physical drilling of a well on the site represents large strides for a project that spans back many years beginning in 1994 with the City’s resolution to designate this area as an Agricultural Reserve in the General Plan, the adoption of the site’s Agricultural Master Plan into the General Plan in January 2011, and the leasing of the 21-acre site by the City of San Luis Obispo to CCG on January 7, 2013. With many other successful projects under the organization’s belt, the drilling of the well brings to the forefront the impacts that CCG can have not only on the community but also on the physical land. As the City Farm progresses, the drilling of the well will always be remembered as the first physical event that made it all possible.

well work

The well will allow farmers to produce fresh, local foods that fill San Luis Obispo with as much diversity and resilience as the food will actually fill stomachs. With a 10-inch casing drilled as deep as 130 feet, the well taps into the water table beneath the land and pumps the water to the surface where future growers may access it. With a capacity of up to 400 gallons per minute, the potential rate of the water flow exceeds the 250 gallons per minute that the land is anticipated to require.

The next steps at City Farm, San Luis Obispo include the installation of a below-ground irrigation mainline and the leasing of one half to one acre plots to individual organizations within the community. The future leasers of these small plots will be schools, demonstrators, and motivated individuals who wish to use agriculture and local foods to teach, train, and give back through the idea of fostering local diversity, resilience and nutrition. For additional information, please visit www.centralcoastgrown.org.